Industry Sectors

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Industrial REITs Post Soft Performance Despite Surging Demand

As job growth in the professional services sector has increased substantially over the past several years, office real estate investment trusts (REITs) have benefited from strong leasing fundamentals. However, more office construction and oversupply concentrated in major metro areas such as New York City, Houston, and Washington, D.C., continue to concern those in the market. Plus, interest rate survey data from Trepp.

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Developments in the Victory Park area in downtown Dallas. The Katy Trail for cyclists and pedestrians cuts through this area and there is also a DART light rail station.

Rebounding Energy Sector Plus $2 Billion in TOD Buoy Development in Dallas

At a ULI North Texas event in Dallas, panelists said that the renewed optimism among small business owners, strong consumer confidence, and a robust U.S. job market suggest that the next recession may be further away than predicted just a year ago. The Dallas-Fort Worth area is well-positioned for further gains, as 16 competed or under construction projects near DART stations are forecast to produce $2 billion in economic development.

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Office REITs Face Oversupply in Key Markets, Shift to Secondary Markets Elsewhere

As job growth in the professional services sector has increased substantially over the past several years, office real estate investment trusts (REITs) have benefited from strong leasing fundamentals. However, more office construction and oversupply concentrated in major metro areas such as New York City, Houston, and Washington, D.C., continue to concern those in the market. Plus, interest rate survey data from Trepp.

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Amazon and the Evolution of a Downtown Corporate Campus

Three of the primary participants in the creation of Amazon’s headquarters in downtown Seattle came together during the 2017 ULI Spring Meeting for a discussion of the long history.

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Recent Articles

  • Legalized Marijuana Sector Creates Opportunity, Special Requirements

    May 12, 2017

    Commercialized marijuana is big business and is expanding as a new asset class at an astronomical rate, according to a ULI Spring Meeting panel of industry investors, operators, and legal experts on the state of the cannabis business and real estate opportunities being created in the sector. Twenty-eight states have legalized the sale of medical marijuana, and eight states plus the District of Columbia allow recreational marijuana to some degree.

  • Millennial’s Desires Changing Design of Modern MPCs

    May 10, 2017

    Developers of master-planned communities (MPCs) must prepare for the next generation of buyers who will be more sophisticated and more discerning because they will come from urban environments, attendees were told at the 2017 ULI Spring Meeting.

  • Weyerhaueser, GE Make the Move to Downtown Headquarters Sites

    Some of America’s largest and oldest industrial powerhouses are moving their headquarters locations from bucolic suburban office parks to vibrant downtown neighborhoods, positioning themselves for growth in the digital age. Two such relocations—Weyerhauser and General Electric—were discussed at the ULI Spring Meeting in Seattle.

  • The Housing Paradox: Why Can’t Cities Build Enough Housing to Match Job Growth?

    Why do cities with the fastest-growing economies—including Seattle, San Francisco, New York City, and Austin–suffer from a growing imbalance between job growth and housing supply? A panel at the ULI Spring Meeting in Seattle examined why hot-market cities are failing to build enough housing for new workers, often by staggering ratios.

  • More Food Choices, Higher-End Offerings Help Reboot Retail for a Digital Age

    Contrary to some predictions, e-commerce has not made brick-and-mortar retail a thing of the past. Instead, as attendees at a ULI Spring Meeting session learned, shopping and dining are making critical contributions to activating urban spaces and helping shopping centers continuously evolve.

  • Targeted Use of Sensors Help Cities Track Impact of Traffic and Weather

    The evolution of “smart” cities is about solving specific problems more than sweeping urban transformation, panelists emphasized during the 2017 ULI Spring Meeting. Targeted programs with clear benefits are defining smart cities, not the widespread embrace of new technology, they said. In Seattle, “smart” means expanding the network of low-cost sensors, which is allowing for adaptive traffic signals and detailed weather mapping that can track microclimates and rain surges.

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