See also, Top 25 Transportation Sources to Follow on Twitter.

Can Twitter be valuable to professionals in the housing industry? Not only is Twitter valuable for those wanting to interact with key thought leaders, journalists, and associations in the housing industry, but it is also valuable for finding timely information and identifying developments and trends within the sector.

In addition, Twitter is a valuable tool for marketers of multifamily developments looking to monitor what is being said about their project and handle resident concerns. Perhaps of greatest importance, it helps developers and marketers stay abreast of what is working and not working for their industry peers.

Urban Land magazine compiled a list of the most influential housing industry people on Twitter.  This ranking includes the person’s name and Twitter handle alongside his or her rankings in reach, engagement, and influence. The persons’ Twitalyzer, Klout, and PeerIndex scores have been included, as well.

The methodology used to create the list employed several factors, including influence, number of followers, who each follows, and number of retweets. The methodology is explained in more detail below the chart.

Following is a list of the top 15 people and entities on Twitter covering the housing industry:

Rank

Name

Twitter Handle

Twitalyzer Score

Klout  Score

PeerIndex Score

1

Inman News

@inmannews

98

57

26

2

Binyamin Appelbaum

@bcappelbaum

97

60

53

3

Housing Wire

@housingwire

97

53

11

4

Urban Land Institute

@UrbanLandInst

97

52

38

5

Bill McBride

@calculatedrisk

97

51

26

6

Nick Timiraos

@nicktimiraos

96

60

33

7

NAR Research

@NAR_Research

94

48

44

8

Builder Online

@builderonline

94

46

46

9

Wall Street Journal Developments Blog

@wsjdevelopments

93

48

20

10

Standard & Poor’s

@standardpoors

91

48

60

11

Diana Olick

@diana_olick

90

52

41

12

Nate Berg

@nate_berg

89

52

45

13

Jonathan Miller

@jonathanmiller

88

48

50

14

National Association of Home Builders

@NAHBhome

88

45

17

15

National Mortgage News

@natmortgagenews

85

56

56

The methodology used to create the list employed several factors:

“Influence” was the first criterion used. The theory behind this strategy is that if an influential person follows someone, then that person is likely influential. A person cannot be influential within a specific area or online community—housing, in this case—if he or she is not followed by other influential people.

A small group of housing industry thought leaders was initially picked for examination.  Each thought leader had to meet specific follower/following requirements before being included into the subject pool. These leaders’ main Twitter pages were run through a content analysis, with an eye toward identifying overlaps or “shared” people who were followed among the group’s thought leaders.

This second group was then collected and measured through different established algorithms to determine popularity and influence. Rankings were then ordered based on their Twitalyzer score, a comprehensive measurement that produces a 100-point-scale numerical score based on the number of followers, how often the user is retweeted, how frequently that person tweets, and the number of times that person is referenced or cited by others.

Urban Land Institute