By almost any measure, housing prices across the country have been rebounding in 2010. One leading measure of U.S. home prices, the Standard & Poor’s/Case Shiller monthly 20-metro index that tracks matched pairs of single-family sales, has shown year-over-year price gains throughout this year.

Meanwhile, the National Association of Realtors reported the national median price of existing single-family homes rose 1% in August after rising almost 4% during the first half of 2010. Many major metropolitan areas – particularly along the East Coast and in the Midwest – have enjoyed a resurgence in home prices. This suggests the housing market is recovering slowly on its own without the home-buyer tax credit, and it’s another sign of the general upturn in the real estate market across much of the country.

Among the nation’s largest metros, here is a list of the Top 10 highest percentage gains in existing home prices during the first half of this year:

Metro

4Q 2009 median price

2Q 2010 median price

Change

Indianapolis

$111,500

$129,900

16.5%

Newark, NJ

$341,100

$386,500

13.3%

Columbus, OH

$132,500

$149,700

13.0%

St. Louis

$126,800

$143,100

12.9%

Pittsburgh

$114,300

$126,600

10.8%

Oklahoma City

$136,300

$149,900

10.0%

Buffalo

$110,700

$121,400

9.7%

Des Moines

$143,400

$156,200

8.9%

Boston

$332,500

$360,200

8.3%

Washington D.C.

$306,200

$331,600

8.3%

(Source: National Association of Realtors.)