Author: Jack Skelley

Jack Skelley writes about urban design, architecture and real estate. A senior partner at Paolucci Communication Arts, Skelley edits the firm’s “marketeering and urbaneering” e-newsletter and blog, The Hot Sheet. He serves on the Executive Committee of Urban Land Institute, Los Angeles and writes frequently for FORM, Urban Land and Riviera magazine, where he is a Contributing Writer

Articles by Jack Skelley

  • Waiting for the Robo-Garage?
    Published on August 30, 2012 in Infrastructure
    As cities become denser, the cost of high-density parking begins to pencil out for developers—which is when the development of parking that automatically stores and retrieves cars becomes attractive.
  • Growth Gateway Cities Are Rare Bright Spots
    Published on October 31, 2011 in Market Trends
    According to Emerging Trends, the real estate report from PWC and ULI presented at a ULI 2011 Fall Meeting press conference in L.A. last week, a handful of urban centers are climbing out of recession and may serve as models for the rest of the country. Washington, D.C., remained the number-one city for the third consecutive year; read more to see how the other cities fared in this year’s survey.
  • Hollywood Condos Go Rental, Stay Chic
    Published on October 12, 2011 in Development
    The Avenue, located at one of the most coveted corners in Hollywood’s current renaissance, was developed as a condominium by an affiliate of John Laing Homes, now submerged in Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The seven-story condominium development was 70 percent complete when Laing halted construction. Read how the property is being repositioned and what the developer considers a key to its approach.
  • Senior Boomers Get Cool Housing
    Published on August 30, 2011 in Residential
    Seniors’ housing is moving back into the city and near a transit stop to appeal to baby boomers, the first wave of whom have already turned 65. Rather than being a seniors’ enclave, this new style of housing for seniors is intended to be integrated with the community and offer amenities and convenience. Read more to learn how the Long Beach Senior Arts Colony in California intends to do just that.
  • Designers vs. Engineers: Pushing for Infrastructure on a Human Scale
    Published on July 29, 2011 in Public Spaces
    When it comes to urban infrastructure—from bridges to transportation systems to master plans—architects impart a sense of place and a human scale. But equally important are basic structural capabilities. Read more to learn what ULI leaders and others have to say about the progress being made in reconciling engineering with architectural values—to the benefit of regions, cities, and the individual.
  • Tear Down That Freeway!
    Published on April 20, 2011 in Sustainability
    It would be better—both economically and in terms of quality of life—for communities that suffer from blight and division to demolish obtrusive throughways, expressways, and overpasses, according to a growing number of advocates of old-fashioned boulevards. Learn what else they have to say about reviving the iconic grand boulevard and read about the transformations that are underway nationwide.
  • ULI California High Speed Rail Conference Looks to France and China
    Published on September 29, 2010 in Infrastructure
    Andreas Heym, director of development for consultants AREP, narrated a tour of French high speed rail stations, and how they connect urban-planning loose ends in many cities, from large metropolises to country towns. Jeff Heller, partner with Heller Manus Architects, and a member of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s high speed rail China delegation, discussed aspects of China’s approach to development of high speed rail.
  • Can Community Outreach Save High Speed Rail?
    Published on September 29, 2010 in Infrastructure
    What if local communities don’t want “huge” and “transformative” when it comes to high-speed rail? Some officials in California have expressed intense opposition to proposed high-speed rail stations, citing concerns about increased traffic and parking requirements. Even Stanford University, which might ordinarily support such progress, is opposed. Are there public outreach efforts that can help overcome these hurdles?